CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

ECTS: 6 credits

Course category: Bard Network Course

Semester: Fall semester

Course summary 

The course will explore historical, philosophical and practical elements of civic engagement while investigating the underlying question of what it means to be an engaged citizen in the early XXI century. Civic Engagement course is taught by the faculty from EHU and Bard Network of partner institutions, this semester including: Bard College in Annandale on Hudson, Al-Quds Bard Partnership, and Bard College Berlin.

  

Criteria for participation

- Genuine interest in collaboration and creation of community projects;

- English B2 (written and spoken);

- Projects in progress are highly welcomed to be continued, as well as ideas for new projects to be developed and implemented within the class.

 

Course objectives

  1. Understand core notions of citizenship and civic engagement.
  2. Development of civic awareness, including an understanding of the concepts of public work, “civic agency” and citizen participation.
  3. Develop the capacity to think critically about the context, impacts, challenges and opportunities of civic engagement activities, including those in which students lead or participate.
  4. Understand various contexts where civic engagement takes place – at different levels (local, national, global) and between/across state and non-state organizations and groups, as well as in countries with different levels of political, social and economic development and diversity of population.
  5. Develop the capacity to understand the basics of project management and to analyze in a comparative context civic engagement projects and movements.
  6. Develop an understanding of the ethical implications of civic engagement activities, particularly for students engaged in civic engagement activities.

 

Expected outcomes

Learning outcomes (program)

Learning outcomes (course)

High residence

Low residence

Learning methods

Evaluation methods

Learning methods

Evaluation methods

1

Knowledge and its application

  • Understand core notions of citizenship and civic engagement. (1)
  • Develop the capacity to think critically about the context, impacts, challenges and opportunities of civic engagement activities, including those in which students lead or participate. (3)

Seminar work, keynote lecture and discussions, expert workshops

Reflection paper

Seminar work, keynote lecture and discussions, expert workshops

Reflection paper

2

Research Skills

  • Understand various contexts where civic engagement takes place – at different levels (local, national, global) and between/across state and non-state organizations and groups, as well as in countries with different levels of political, social and economic development and diversity of population. (4)
  • Develop the capacity to understand the basics of project management and to analyze in a comparative context civic engagement projects and movements. (5)

Seminar work, expert workshops

Case studies, community-based project, interview

Seminar work, expert workshops

Case studies, community-based project, interview

3

Special skills

  • Development of civic awareness, including an understanding of the concepts of public work, “civic agency” and citizen participation. (2)

Seminar work, expert workshops,

class linkages with a partner institution

Case studies, community-based project, interview,

public presentation

Seminar work, expert workshops,

class linkages with a partner institution

Case studies, community-based project, interview,

public presentation

4

Individual skills

  • Develop an understanding of the ethical implications of civic engagement activities, particularly for students engaged in civic engagement activities. (6)

Seminar work, expert workshops,

class linkages with a partner institution

Case studies, community-based project, interview, public presentation

Seminar work, expert workshops,

class linkages with a partner institution

Case studies, community-based project, interview, public presentation

 

Topics

  1.  What is a good citizen/civil society?
  2. How do you act within the bounds of existing civil society? How do citizens/students act locally, nationally and globally?
  3. What are challenges to civil society? What is if there is little/no civil society?
  4. How do we do a project?
  5. What do you do when politics is not enough?
  6. What do we do after we fail?

  

Loading

32h – contact hours (seminars)

128h – individual work

  

Evaluation methods

Reflection paper, interview, case study/community-based project, public presentation 

  

Evaluation and grading

Writing Assignments (Assignments I and II) – 20%

Cass participation – 25%

Class linkages with a partner institution – 15%

Final Project – 40%

 

Core readings

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (vol. 2, part 2, chapters 4–5)

Chaan, Smith et al., “Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular) Occasional) and NonVolunteers in Five Countries”

David Cameron, “Big Society Speech. Transcript of a Speech by the Prime Minister on the Big Society” (https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/big-society-speech)

Interdisciplinary projects of Democracy.doc (available at: https://www.democracydoc.com/projects/)

Jerry Marx and Alison Rataj, “A Case Study in Organizing for Livable and Sustainable Communities”

Jonathan Becker, “Bard College: An Ecosystem of Engagement”

Jules Odendahl-James, “A History of US Documentary Theatre in Three Stages” (available at: https://www.americantheatre.org/2017/08/22/a-history-of-u-s-documentary-theatre-in-three-stages/)

Marc Morjé Howard and Leah Gilbert “Cross-National Comparison of the Internal Effects of Participation in Voluntary Organizations”

Margaret Rundle, “Doing Civics in the Digital Age: Casual, Purposeful, and Strategic Approaches to Participatory Politics”

Russell Dalton, The Good Citizen, Defining the Norms of Citizenship (pp. 26–30)

Suzanne Soule, “Will They Engage? Political Knowledge, Participation and Attitudes of Generations X and Y”

The Venus Project (available at: https://www.thevenusproject.com/)

Thomas H. Sander and Robert D. Putnam, “Still Bowling Alone? The Post-9/11 Split,”

Vaclav Havel, “The Power of the Powerless”

Wendy Brown, “Neoliberalism’s Frankenstein: Authoritarian Freedom in Twenty-First Century’s Democracies”

Youth and Environment: UN Youth Report, Youth and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (available at: https://www.un.org/development/desa/youth/world-youth-report/wyr2018.html)

“Boca del lobo” (available at: https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000006430559/boca-del-lobo.html)

“Natural born settlers” (available at: https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000006401232/natural-born-settlers.html)

“Stonewall” (available at: https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000006525694/stonewall-the-making-of-a-monument.html?playlistId=100000004867895&region=video-grid&version=video-grid-thumbnail&contentCollection=Op-Docs&contentPlacement=8&module=recent-videos&action=click&pgType=Multimedia&eventName=video-grid-click)

“Unsilenced” (available at: https://www.generationnext.us/video/opinion/100000004284660/unsilenced.html?playlistId=100000004201922